Highlights From Our Agencies

Breakthrough Fund Grants Expand Reach of Programs to Jewish Community

The needs of the Chicago area's Jewish community are changing rapidly - where we live, how we live and how we con...

The needs of the Chicago area's Jewish community are changing rapidly - where we live, how we live and how we connect- becoming more dispersed, active and mobile than ever before.  As those shifts occur, Jewish Child & Family Services of Chicago is changing, too, taking on the challenge of expanding their connections to people in the communities where they live, work, worship and learn, and looking for new ways to serve the Jewish community.

In July, JCFS received a huge boost to its efforts to expand its reach beyond brick-and-mortar service centers: The organization was awarded two FY 2015 Breakthrough Grants by the Jewish United Fund/Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago. The grants, totaling $518,436 over three years, will allow JCFS to introduce innovative social support, substance abuse prevention education and addiction services to a wider, diversified audience. Read more here.

JFCS Boston's Visiting Moms Program Leaves Lasting Impressions

Recently, Rimma Zelfand, CEO of Jewish Family & Children's Service of Greater Boston, spoke at a conference h...

Recently, Rimma Zelfand, CEO of Jewish Family & Children's Service of Greater Boston, spoke at a conference held at Simmons College. After her presentation, people came up to her to talk and ask questions. What are the odds that three people told her how the Lauren and Mark Rubin Visiting Moms program through the The Center for Early Relationship Support changed their lives as well of the lives of their loved ones?

The first person to introduce himself to Rimma was the husband of a woman who had premature twins five years ago. When the couple finally brought the twins home from the hospital, there was a lot of confusion and the mother was under an extreme amount of stress. Luckily, the couple contacted JF&CS and soon they became involved with the Oliver, Ian, and Serenity Wolk Fragile Beginnings program as well as one of the support groups in Newton for the families of multiples. The Visiting Moms program also came to the rescue, sending a compassionate volunteer to the home for empathetic support, guidance, and companionship. The husband credited those three services for saving his marriage. Continue reading here.

Refugees Find Growing Community in Toldeo, Ohio Thanks to HIAS Partnership

For new refugees, resettling in the U.S. is about more than finding a job and a new home; it's about rebuilding a...

For new refugees, resettling in the U.S. is about more than finding a job and a new home; it's about rebuilding a sense of community and fostering new long-lasting relationships.

While New York and Chicago are large metropolises with vibrant inner-city neighborhoods and comprehensive public transportation systems, Toledo, Ohio is a small city with a spread-out population and limited public transportation, making it hard to get around.

Ghaziyah, a 63-year old Iraqi widow who resettled to the U.S. to reunite with her son just a few months ago, initially struggled to connect with a community in Toledo. The closest refugee assistance organization was more than an hour away by car in Columbus. Settling in was hard for her as five of her six children are in Iraq and she has never worked professionally.

The opening of HIAS partner US Together's new office this past month, however, is dramatically improving the lives of refugees like Ghaziyah. Continue reading here.